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Descriptions
COMP_SCI 397, 497: Advanced Graphics Seminar

Quarter Offered

Spring : MF 11 - 12:20 ; Tumblin

Prerequisites

Completion of one or more of these courses, or graduate enrollment: • COMP_SCI 331 Introduction to Computational Photography • ELEC_ENG 395/495 Computational Photography Seminar • COMP_SCI 351-1 Introduction to Computer Graphics • COMP_SCI 351-2 Intermediate Computer Graphics • COMP_SCI 376 Game Design and Development • COMP_SCI 377 Game Development Studio

Description

What is the long-term outlook for this field? How will computer graphics and computational photography advance beyond its current state? What are the ‘dead end’ methods, and what approaches are most likely to transform the field and have lasting impact?

This broad-ranging survey of recently published research papers in computer graphics and computational photography will attempt to identify and explore new directions and important emerging topics in computer-assisted synthesis, capture, analysis, and assessment of visual information.

In the initial ‘idea gathering’ phase, students work together to build a large bibliography from recent juried papers published at reputable conferences and journals, prioritize them by titles and abstracts, and through class discussions identify specific topics that are likely to yield significant advances and have long-term impact. In the second ‘in-depth study’ phase, we pursue these student-selected topics by surveys of paper abstracts, selective in-depth reading, in-class presentations, and a final written survey paper, or alternatively, a demonstration project to illustrate key principles and methods.

COURSE GOALS:

  • Familiarity with a broad set of current research topics and methods in computational photography and computer graphics, and a fair understanding of their connections and relationships to other fields;
  • Ability to discuss cogently the strengths, weaknesses and applicability of the methods to broader problems
  • Readiness and/or motivation to pursue research work in at one or more student-selected topic areas

Grades:

  • Class participation, 4 short-form reports, 1 in-class presentation, 1 Literature Survey(written) or Demo Project

COURSE COORDINATORS: Prof. Jack Tumblin

COURSE INSTRUCTOR : Prof. Tumblin