Research
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Research Areas
Biomechanics

Biomechanics is the study of the structure and function of biological systems, using the methods of mechanics. Biomechanics can be applied to whole organisms, organs, cells and cell organelles. Biomechanical experimental measures and computational approaches are fundamental to nearly every possible biomedical engineering application.

In BME at Northwestern University, rigid body biomechanics research aims to better understand the neural control of movement, to improve rehabilitation interventions, and to develop medical devices such as exoskeletons, prosthetics, and orthotics. Our faculty also use biomechanics as a tool to uncover the mechanisms of sensorimotor integration, and to develop biomimetic robots. Many of our research interests in the cardiovascular and visual systems rely on methodologies from fluid and continuum mechanics.

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Cardiovascular

Credit: 4D Flow MRI for Assessment of Renal Transplant Dysfunction (Michael Markl)

Research Topics

Cardiac MRI • heart tissue, function & perfusion • 4D flow imaging • highly accelerated AI based rapid MRI • atrial fibrillation • heart transplantation • congenital heart disease • mechanobiology • mechanical regulation of pathogenesis

Faculty





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Drug Delivery and Discovery

Credit: Targeted Delivery of Cell Softening Micelles (Mark Johnson and Evan Scott)

Research Topics

Mechanical properties of nanoparticles • cytoskeleton targeting drugs • membrane fusion

Faculty

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Rehabilitation

Credit: Biomechanical Modeling (Wendy Murray)

Research Topics

Animal mechanics • bionics • joint mechanics • motor control • motor impairment • muscle mechanics and physiology • musculoskeletal modeling • neuromechanics • prosthetics • medical imaging for biomechanics applications • motion analysis • robotics • wearable sensors

Faculty

Core Faculty

Courtesy Faculty

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Vision and Ophthalmology

Credit: Glaucoma Nanodrugs (Mark Johnson)

Research Topics

Glaucoma • age-related macular degeneration • retina • ganglion cells • cell mechanics • extracellular matrix • finite element modeling • fluid mechanics

Faculty





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