BME Advisory Board Welcomes Morris and Chen

The Department of Biomedical Engineering is excited to welcome Milton Morris and Emile Chen as the newest members of its advisory board.

Milton Morris     Emile Chen

 

 

 

 

 

The Department of Biomedical Engineering is excited to welcome Milton Morris and Emile Chen as the newest members of its advisory board.

Morris is president and CEO at NeuSpera Medical Inc., a medical device company that specializes in bioelectronic medicine. The company has experienced steady growth fueled by more than $35 million in investment capital toward the development of its ultra-miniaturized neurostimulators that are used to treat an array of chronic and debilitating diseases.

Prior to joining NeuSpera Medical, Morris served as principal at MEH BioMedical, where he helped jumpstart the creation of startup companies in the biomedical device space. He also served as senior vice president of research and development and emerging therapies at Cyberonics, a medical device company that uses vagus nerve stimulation therapy to treat epilepsy and depression.

An inventor on 30 patents and author of 20 peer-reviewed publications and book chapters, Morris earned his MBA at the Kellogg School of Management, his master’s and PhD in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan, and his bachelor’s in electrical engineering from Northwestern.

Chen is director of system modeling and translational biology at GlaxoSmithKline, one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical companies. In his role, he uses physiologically-based PK/PD modeling, quantitative system pharmacology, and other mathematical modeling techniques to solve project questions and enhance scientific productivity.

Chen holds more than 22 years of industrial experience ranging from early discovery to late-stage development, including authoring and reviewing regulatory documentation and New Drug Application submissions. He has led efforts to improve research and development productivity using innovative mathematical modeling and simulation methods to help reduce attrition while enhancing the ability to predict efficacy and safety in humans.

Chen received his bachelor’s degree from the University of California at Los Angeles and his PhD from Northwestern in biomedical engineering, specializing in developing mathematical models for information processing in the brain.