McCormick Magazine

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Greetings from McCormick

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Image of Julio OttinoMcCormick prides itself on providing its students a well-rounded education that encourages both analysis and creativity, a concept that we call whole-brain engineering™. Nowhere is this more apparent than in two of our major initiatives: the Farley Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation and the Segal Design Institute. These two initiatives have established a culture of innovation that infuses every part of the school. From undergraduate and graduate design education, where students develop solutions to a wide range of problems (including, as highlighted in this issue, devices for patients at the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago) to entrepreneurship courses, funding, and incubator space, both faculty and students are provided the knowledge and support they need to innovate solutions for the world’s most pressing problems. In this issue we chart the course of these initiatives and show you some success stories.

We also highlight how our research and education is making a local impact. Our Infrastructure Technology Institute is working with the Chicago Transit Authority to determine strain on a century-old bridge. They are using state-of-the-art sensors that provide insight into the structural health of the bridge.

On our cover you can see a photo from our Architectural Engineering and Design Program’s recent study abroad trip to Berlin. Students spent a week there in the offices of world-renowned architect Helmut Jahn, gaining a unique perspective on architecture and engineering while receiving feedback from Jahn and other well-known stakeholders in the architecture world. The program, now three years old, is another example of McCormick’s commitment to design and innovation: students in the program are using their background in engineering and their studies in architecture to prepare to create the built environment of the future.

As always, I welcome your feedback.

Julio M. Ottino, Dean | April 2011