Razeghi is Invited Speaker at IEEE Emerging Optical Materials Workshop

Prof. Razeghi presented her paper, titled, “Atomic Engineering of III-V Semiconductor for Quantum Devices from Deep UV(200nm) up to THZ(300 microns)” at MIT Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, MA on Wednesday, April 12, 2017.

Prof. Manijeh Razeghi was an Invited Speaker at the Boston Chapter of the IEEE Photonics Society's Emerging Optical Materials Workshop (EOM17).

Prof. Razeghi presented her paper, titled, “Atomic Engineering of III-V Semiconductor for Quantum Devices from Deep UV(200nm) up to THZ(300 microns)” at MIT Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington, MA on Wednesday, April 12, 2017.

Prof. Manijeh RazeghiPaper Abstract: Nature offers us a full assortment of atoms, but nanoengineering is required to put them together in an elegant way to realize functional structures not found in nature. A particular rich playground for nanotechnology is the so-called III-V semiconductors, made of atoms from columns III and V of the periodic table, and constituting compounds with many useful optical and electronic properties in their own right.  Guided by highly accurate simulations of the electronic structure, modern semiconductor optoelectronic devices are literally made atom by atom using advanced growth technology such as molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition to combine these materials in ways to give them new proprieties that neither material has on its own.  Modern mastery of materials growth and characterization with the help of such techniques allows high-power and highly efficient functional devices to be made, such as those that convert electrical energy into coherent light or detect light of any wavelength and convert it into an electrical signal.

This talk will present the latest world-class research breakthroughs at Center for Quantum Devices (CQD) at Northwestern university, that have brought quantum engineering to an unprecedented level, creating light detectors and emitters over an extremely wide spectral range from 0.2 to 300 microns. WOCSDICE is an annual meeting with a long standing tradition as it was established in1973. The workshop brings together internationally recognised researchers and promising young scientists and engineers to disseminate state-of-the-art research findings in the areas of compound semiconductor materials, associated devices and integrated circuits. Last WOCSDICE workshops were organized in Leuwen (2008), Malaga (2009), Darmstadt (2010), Catania (2011) and Porquerolles (2012).

EOM17: New lower-dimensional optical materials, enabled by recent advances in nano-fabrication technologies, are advancing photonic technology beyond that allowed by conventional three-dimensional bulk optical materials. These emerging optical materials are of new compositions, or traditional compounds fabricated in lower dimensional geometries on a micro and nanoscale, specially customized for particular usages. Examples are: carbon nanotubes; two-dimensional photonic crystals and meta material surface coatings; and low dimensional Van-der-Waals systems such as graphene, silicene, germanene, and boron nitride. Carbon, either as two-dimensional graphene, or one-dimensional nanotubes, are of great interest for their unusual optical as well as electronic properties. Topological insulators, where a thin two-dimensional conducting sheet is formed on an insulator by its topology, is an emerging material with spintronics applications. Three-dimensional printing and mask-less lithography of materials is incorporating these lower-dimensional materials in new novel applications. These synthetic lower-dimensional photonic materials bridge the microscopic quantum world and the mesoscopic world, enabling advances in photonic devices for communication, sensing, bio-medicine, optical interconnects, quantum computation, medical diagnostics, and compact low-cost manufacturing.

This workshop will bring together the leading experts in this field to discuss the latest research in lower-dimensional optical materials and their future technological applications. This workshop also aims to foster communication and collaboration through networking among the individual engineers and researchers attending. Learn more about the rapid advances of novel lower-dimensional optical materials directly from the foremost researchers in the different specialties involved, by registering for and attending this local Boston Emerging Optical Materials Workshop.