Choudhary Saluted as Leading Figure in Burgeoning Field of Mar Tech by Adweek

He was chosen for his work with 4C, as one of the forward-thinking women and men who are rapidly reimagining marketing and advertising technology.

Prof. Alok Choudhary was chosen by Adweek for his work with 4C, a social intelligence and advertising platform, which he founded, as one of the forward-thinking women and men who are rapidly reimagining marketing and advertising technologypitching a new world order where CRM and digital ads work hand in hand. AdWeek is the largest publication in the Marketing and Advertising space.


Prof. Alok ChoudharyTo some, 4C is best known as a social insights company. Choudhary and his team, however, are at the forefront of ad targeting not just online but also via TV. They recently ran a campaign via Turner Broadcasting channels for a major Hollywood film and got three times better engagement when compared to other TV buys. On Facebook, Nice ’n Easy used 4C to sync television spots with Facebook video in the U.K., and the CPG brand got 40 percent more video views than usual at a lower cost per engagement. “Campaign setup and management was intuitive with training and support provided to ensure a seamless activation,” says Oscar Romero, head of biddable international at Performics, which worked on the Nice ’n Easy effort.

Prof. Choudhary is 
Chairman and Chief Scientist of 4C, a global leader in data science and media technology with solutions for multi-screen convergence. Brands, agencies, and media owners use 4C to improve effectiveness on TV, digital, social and mobile. The 4C product suite includes activation on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, and Instagram as well as TV synced ads across display, search, social and video. The company also provides advertising and content analytics leveraging its global TV monitoring network and proprietary social affinity database.

Excerpted from "Meet the 26 Trailblazers Revolutionizing the Field of Marketing Technology" | 5/21/2017 by Christopher Heine. Read the full Adweek article